Moshi Moshi

Kelly Elkins. 22. Queer. Vegan. Welsh.

I drink a lot of tea and read a lot of books.

One day I just woke up and realized that I can’t touch yesterday. So why the heck was I letting it touch me?

—Steve Maraboli (via versteur)

(Source: psych-facts, via crashing-dream)

Most humans are never fully present in the now, because unconsciously they believe that the next moment must be more important than this one. But then you miss your whole life, which is never not now.

— Eckhart Tolle (via tellmefive)

(Source: purplebuddhaproject, via crashing-dream)

humansofnewyork:

"The fighting got very bad. When I left Syria to come here, I only had $50. I was almost out of money when I got here. I met a man on the street, who took me home, and gave me food and a place to stay. But I felt so ashamed to be in his home, that I spent 11 hours a day looking for jobs, and only came back to sleep. I finally found a job at a hotel. They worked me 12 hours a day, for 7 days a week. They gave me $400 a month. Now I found a new hotel now that is much better. I work 12 hours per day for $600 a month, and I get one day off. In all my free hours, I work at a school as an English teacher. I work 18 hours per day, every day. And I have not spent any of it. I have not bought even a single T-shirt. I’ve saved 13,000 Euro, which is how much I need to buy fake papers. There is a man I know who can get me to Europe for 13,000. I’m leaving next week. I’m going once more to Syria to say goodbye to my family, then I’m going to leave all this behind. I’m going to try to forget it all. And I’m going to finish my education." (Erbil, Iraq)

humansofnewyork:

"The fighting got very bad. When I left Syria to come here, I only had $50. I was almost out of money when I got here. I met a man on the street, who took me home, and gave me food and a place to stay. But I felt so ashamed to be in his home, that I spent 11 hours a day looking for jobs, and only came back to sleep. I finally found a job at a hotel. They worked me 12 hours a day, for 7 days a week. They gave me $400 a month. Now I found a new hotel now that is much better. I work 12 hours per day for $600 a month, and I get one day off. In all my free hours, I work at a school as an English teacher. I work 18 hours per day, every day. And I have not spent any of it. I have not bought even a single T-shirt. I’ve saved 13,000 Euro, which is how much I need to buy fake papers. There is a man I know who can get me to Europe for 13,000. I’m leaving next week. I’m going once more to Syria to say goodbye to my family, then I’m going to leave all this behind. I’m going to try to forget it all. And I’m going to finish my education." (Erbil, Iraq)

(via scottishwallace)

farfrompaid:

blastortoise:

black people: haha white people can’t dance

white person: oh but if i said black people are too busy eating watermelon to get off their monkey lazy nigger asses then it would be racist???

white person: I am so SICK of these double standards……

this is truly the most accurate post.

(via vegankween)

I can’t abandon
the person I used to be
so I carry her

—365 Days of Haiku (Day #123)

(Source: idreamof-pb, via shes-elecktric)

humansofnewyork:

“I had a mobile phone and computer store back in Syria. It was completely looted during the fighting. I came here to find work, but I couldn’t afford to bring my family with me. When I left, I kissed my son and told him that I was leaving and I didn’t know where I was going. He was crying so hard that we had to lock him in the house as I said ‘goodbye’ to my wife. I haven’t even met my second son.”“What are your happiest memories of your son?”“Every time I went to work, he’d run after me. And every time I came home, he’d run to me.” (Erbil, Iraq)

humansofnewyork:

“I had a mobile phone and computer store back in Syria. It was completely looted during the fighting. I came here to find work, but I couldn’t afford to bring my family with me. When I left, I kissed my son and told him that I was leaving and I didn’t know where I was going. He was crying so hard that we had to lock him in the house as I said ‘goodbye’ to my wife. I haven’t even met my second son.”
“What are your happiest memories of your son?”
“Every time I went to work, he’d run after me. And every time I came home, he’d run to me.” (Erbil, Iraq)